Don’t Let Your TSA PreCheck Expire!

I am a busy woman, okay? I’ve got books piled up on my nightstand, waiting to be read. I’ve got a stack of New Yorker magazines gathering dust on the living room end table. There are recipes I want to try, hikes I want to take, and then there’s that pesky job waiting for me too. I tell you all this to offer up an excuse for why I didn’t realize until last Friday that my five year Global Entry membership expires in three weeks. Whoops.

I do vaguely remember getting an email about this some time ago, and I’m sure I told myself that there was plenty of time to renew. Well, time is now clearly running out for me to get my handy dandy TSA Pre-Check on each flight I take in the next few months.

Once I realized that my procrastination had gotten out of hand, I hastily got into my account on the Trusted Traveler website and filled out my online renewal. Among other things, I had to list every country I have visited since 2014. (Note to self: keep better records.) It’s possible I may have forgotten one country. Will this throw a wrench into my renewal? To be determined. After several screens of questions, I was able to pay my renewal fee of $100, and send in my renewal application. It’s unclear if I’ll have to do another in-person interview at a Global Entry office. It’s also unclear how long the renewal process will take. Some take a few weeks, others longer. It appears I might be able to keep my Global Entry membership while my application is under review, even after my current one expires. But I’ll believe it when I see it.

So if you’ve got TSA PreCheck or Global Entry – and if you’re a frequent traveler, why don’t you? – do yourself a favor and check the expiration date of your membership. Don’t wait until the last minute to renew. Let us hope the TSA gods shine favorably upon me.

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Pick Up The Phone I’m Always Home

by Nancy Bestor

Last month I traveled to Los Angeles on Allegiant Air out of Medford, Oregon. My round trip flight was $130, a bargain in my opinion. I did not choose a seat ahead of time (up to $80), I did not sign up for preboarding ($4 – $12), I did not request a boarding pass ($5), I did not bring a carry-on suitcase ($10-$75) to go in the overhead compartment, and I did not buy any food or water (water costs $2) on the flight. So although Allegiant can add on fees, one does not have to pay them. And when one opts out, the bargain fare really does remain a bargain. I am perfectly willing to bring my own snacks and fill up a water bottle after going through security in the airport. I am also fine with sitting in any seat on the plane, as long as my flight is a short one. I had no complaints about my flight, but I did have one complaint about Allegiant.

I forgot to enter my Global Entry “known traveler id number” when I booked my flight. Once I realized this, I figured I could easily add it to my Allegiant ticket. Well I figured wrong. After some internet research, I determined that the best way to add my id number would be to call Allegiant. Apparently, cheap tickets translate to few customer service representatives, because I waited on the phone for 55 minutes before giving up. Allegiant’s website said you can call their phone number (it didn’t say that someone would answer—ha) or add your id number with an agent at the airport. I figured I could add it in Medford, and although it might not work for my flight down to LA, it would certainly work for the flight back. Once again, I figured wrong. The Allegiant agents at the ticket counter, although very nice, had absolutely NO IDEA what I was talking about. One of them had never even heard of a known traveler id number. I found myself having to explain what the id number is, then having to educate them on what it says on Allegiant’s website about adding it to my ticket. Needless to say, they were not able to help me and I didn’t get TSA precheck in either direction.

It wasn’t the worst thing in the world though. And again, my direct flight was only $130 round trip. I learned my lesson too. From here on out, I will ALWAYS put my known traveler id number in my booking when I make it, and I will not expect a customer service person to answer a phone. Because how ridiculous is that?