When an Expiration Date is not Really an Expiration Date

by Nancy Bestor

passportUS passports for adults are good for 10 years. I got mine in December of 2007 which means it will expire in December, 2017. But if I want to travel to say, Ecuador, my passport really will expire on June 1, 2017. Huh? It is somewhat confusing, but a growing number of countries (currently more than 50) require US Citizens to have at least six months remaining on their passport upon entry into their country. The reason for this is a little vague to me. One thing I’ve heard is that the US started requiring foreign citizens to have at least six months on their passports when visiting the US, so other countries are just returning the favor. Other things I’ve read says it keeps tourists from staying over their allotted number of days on a visa, which for many of these countries is good for six months. Whatever the reason, many travelers have realized too late that their passport expiration date is not good enough when traveling to a pretty good sized list of countries around the world.

The best advice I can give regarding passport expiration is that you should renew your passport about nine months before it is set to expire. Write it down on your calendar, or set your Smartphone calendar app to give you a message at the nine month mark. This way you’ll have plenty of time to send your passport in for renewal, and you won’t have to worry about your passport “expiring” if a last minute trip to Thailand or Trinidad & Tobago comes up. Oh to be so fortunate.

And since countries always seem to be altering their entry requirements, you can get the most up to date information for any country at the US State Department’s website. Just type in the country you are interested in to find out exactly what you’ll need to visit. I’m gonna look up French Polynesia and hope that a last minute trip magically appears in my near future.

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